Thursday Schedule

October 8, 2015

12 p.m. Check-in /Registration opens

LOCATION: 1st Floor

 

3:30 – 5 p.m.

 

The Only Way to Write a Novel

LOCATION: Room 112A

DESCRIPTION: There’s a story you love, a character you adore or can’t stand, a moment you’re fascinated by, a concept that captivates you. How do you transform the scenes, ideas and characters in your head into an exquisite, profound novel that you’re proud of? In this workshop, Yvonne Fly Onakeme Etaghene will share lessons and specific tools she learned in the process of writing her first novel, For Sizakele. This workshop will focus on the writing process, editing, character development, plot outlines, the importance of discipline, and how to answer that ever haunting and persistent question: How do you know when your novel is done?

WORKSHOP LEADER: Yvonne Fly Onakeme Etaghene

 

Translating Black LGBTQ Writing: Expanding the Global Conversation

LOCATION: Room 111AB

DESCRIPTION: This workshop will explore the process of selection, translation and publication of non-Anglophone black LGBTQ writing from across the globe, in order to expand our conversation about black LGBTQ lives and cultures. In addition to presentations of translated works, the workshop will encourage participants to discuss and propose works for future translation, and strategize about ways to increase translations of black LGBTQ translated writing in the U.S. and across the Anglophone world.

WORKSHOP LEADER: John Keene

Voyeur: Giving (In)Credible Testimony to the Act of Sex

LOCATION: Room 112B

DESCRIPTION: At some point or another many of us are challenged to write a scene that involves the erotic. But when and where does the act of sex begin if not in thought and in the mind? Where and when does it end? Beyond the mechanics of thrust and groan, of licking and size and moisture, this workshop will explore how sex can be written in such a way that it credibly transcends the flesh while enhancing our characters and enriching the creative work as a whole.

WORKSHOP LEADER: G. Winston James

 

The Revival: Church of the Traveling Queer

LOCATION: Room 114AB

Via this interactive multimedia panel, we intend to present a how-to manual of sorts: How to create, produce and promote a literary tour. How to survive nine cities in eight days with seven women in one van. How to document the process and make a movie. Jade Foster, the Revival mastermind, will discuss aspects relative to organizing and fundraising. t’ai freedom ford will share insights as an artist and as creative director, responsible for booking talent for the last tour. Eli Turner will highlight logistics of the tour as road manager. And Sekiya Dorsett, the filmmaker, will discuss making the documentary.

MODERATOR: Natasha Miller
PANELISTS: Sekiya Dorsett, t’ai freedom ford, Jade Foster and Eli Turner

5 – 7 p.m.

Dinner

(not provided)

7 – 9:30 p.m.

FILM SCREENING: Women and the Word: The Revival Movie

LOCATION: The Carr Center
311 E. Grand River Ave.
Detroit, MI 48226

DESCRIPTION: Through poetry, concert footage and candid conversations, Women and the Word: The Revival Movie chronicles the journey of five strangers who toured the country with nothing in common except the word. The documentary features interviews with leading black feminist thinkers including Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Farah Tanis and Kim Katrin Milan, as well as literary luminaries Nikky Finney and Alexis de Veaux. Women and the Word: The Revival Movie attempts to name what it means to be black, to be woman, to be queer, to be.

 

Suggested social spot:

Schoolhouse Thursday’s presents: Magic Tricks

With DJ Magic, Bruce Bailey, Larry Vibe and Rebecca Goldberg

M!X Bricktown
641 Beaubien St.
Detroit, MI 48226

 

Friday schedule

October 9, 2015

 

Altar Room

LOCATION: Room 115 (open all day)

 

7 – 8 a.m.

 

Morning Literary Stretches

LOCATION: Room 112A

For the uninitiated to the world of literary conferences and for the ones who return to these opportunities of learning and sharing, we offer a pre-workshop “Morning Literary Stretch” led by Marvin K. White. Consider this yoga, the gym, meditation, stretching and centering before the day’s events. Full of fun and reflection-filled, pencil and pen moving exercises and imaginings, this time is reserved for blood pumping and mind opening, to energize and welcome you into the day.

WORKSHOP LEADER: Marvin K. White

 

8 – 9 a.m.

 

Breakfast

(not provided)

 

9 – 10:30 a.m.

 

LGBTQ Film: Twelve Disciples of Nelson Mandela

Directed by Thomas Allen Harris
LOCATION: Room 111AB
Film program co-curated by Ernest Hardy and Tisa Bryant

 

Blogging for HIV Transcendence

LOCATION: Room 112A

DESCRIPTION: This workshop explores the unique role and opportunity of queer, HIV-positive (poz) bloggers and digital writers of color during this period of concurrent sociopolitical movements (i.e., trans* equality, resistance to the prison industrial complex / war on drugs / HIV criminalization, and widespread response to systemic racism / Black Lives Matter, etc.). Facilitators will cover how to effectively share our truths, digital presence and branding, as well as effectively cultivate relationships with publications and movements.

WORKSHOP LEADERS: Francisco White and Tabias Wilson

 

Hearing Voices: Creating Dynamic Plays

LOCATION: Room 110A

DESCRIPTION: The sound of our voices carries the stories of our happiness and loss, our triumph and tragedies. And, like poetry, the silence between these sounds also speaks loudly. This workshop will focus on the seed elements that bring these voices alive. We’ll practice developing characters, creating dramatic tension, and making your people sound like themselves. We’ll do writing exercises that build upon each other to create a successful scene. Prep: Write down five to ten sentences you’ve overheard between two random people, and a physical description of those people, and bring to the workshop.

WORKSHOP LEADER: Jewelle Gomez

 

Diversify Your Portfolio: Managing Your Career and Practicing Your Craft

LOCATION: Room 112B

DESCRIPTION: Diversifying Your Portfolio offers strategies, best practices and tools to manage your writing career and practice your craft, both essential aspects of developing a successful and fulfilling career as an artist. The workshop is an interactive, discussion-based workshop designed to challenge writers and poets in their thinking and approach to their careers. The workshop includes a presentation highlighting tools for self-publishing, querying major publishers, and creating an online presence. There will be take-away materials provided as well as introductions to online resources such as HootSuite, Submission Management tools and techniques, and WriteorDie.

PANELISTS: Sheree L. Greer and Fiona Zedde

 

Biomythography

LOCATION: Room 112C

DESCRIPTION: Biomythography is a combination of biography, culture and myth: Biography is the story of the writer and myths are our stories of origin. We live by the myths we are given and the ones we create; we create myths to understand what we cannot explain. This has added meaning as a queer person of color. This workshop will explore writing biomythography through a three-step process: imagining to remember (to explore memory), dreaming to transform (to explore the subconscious) and re-imagining to create (to explore inventing identity). Participants will execute these steps through writing exercises and will be asked to share some of their work or their experience of the process.

WORKSHOP LEADER: Ashley Young

 

10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.

 

LGBTQ Film: Vintage and Through a Lens Darkly

Directed by Thomas Allen Harris
LOCATION: Room 111AB
Film program co-curated by Ernest Hardy and Tisa Bryant

 

The Black Body

LOCATION: Room 112B

DESCRIPTION: The black body: loved and feared, desired and reviled, under surveillance and looked upon with lust. With such contradictory impulses toward our selves, both inside and outside our community, how can we write honestly about our bodies? This workshop looks at various ways in which black LGBTQ poets have explored the body in their work, with a special emphasis on the erotic, using these poets’ themes and processes to generate ideas and structures for our own practice.

WORKSHOP LEADER: Reginald Harris

 

Bathini [Zulu: “What Are They Saying?”]

LOCATION: Room 112A

DESCRIPTION: “Bathini” is an exhibition of photographs and the introduction of Zanele Muholi’s photo book, Faces and Phases (2006-2014), which present life stories that celebrate and commemorate the lives of black lesbians at the height of ongoing violent hate crimes (“curative” rapes and murders) in South Africa. Muholi’s work is aimed at increasing the exposure and visibility of us, as her/history makers who continue to contribute toward women’s struggles in South African townships and communities. “Bathini” expresses our existence and ability to exert our presence in a country filled with hate crimes and other prejudices, capturing images of Muholi’s community in order to contribute toward a more democratic and representative South African female homosexual history.

PRESENTER: Zanele Muholi

 

PERFORMANCE: sash & trim

LOCATION: Room 110A

DESCRIPTION: Inspired by autobiography, sash & trim dramatizes one black family’s migration from the South, and the coming of age of one black, gay man as he attempts to reconcile his father’s legacy. Was the first man in his life a philandering husband and father, a romantic singer/songwriter, or both? This session will include a 15-minute talkback about the process of writing and staging autobiographical material.

PRESENTER: Djola Branner

 

12 – 1 p.m.

 

Lunch

(not provided)

1 – 3 p.m.

 

PERFORMANCE: Witness: The Next Generation of Black Theater

LOCATION: Room 113ABC

DESCRIPTION: Award-winning playwrights Azure D. Osborne-Lee and Nia O. Witherspoon present excerpts from their new work for the stage, with actor Anyanwu. Osborne-Lee’s work tends toward the magical and is more often than not set in some version of the American South. Always about black folks and inherently queer, Osborne-Lee’s newest work explores the outer limits of the possibilities of theatre. Witherspoon’s work explores themes of the erotic, violence and spirit, imagined through African-diaspora ways of knowing and told in theatrical jazz. This reading presents selected scenes from Witherspoon’s oeuvre, sharing the experience of black queer ritual.

PRESENTERS: Azure Osborne-Lee, Nia O. Witherspoon and Anyanwu

 

3 – 3:30 p.m.

 

Break

 

3:30 – 5 p.m.

 

LGBTQ Film: Jason & Shirley

Directed by Stephen Winter; followed by a conversation with director Stephen Winter
LOCATION: Room 111AB
Film program co-curated by Ernest Hardy and Tisa Bryant

Queer African Diaspora: Radical Literature & Performance in these Times

LOCATION: Room 113ABC

DESCRIPTION: This panel honors the magical artwork and activism of queer Africans within and outside Africa, and will center ways queer African liberation movements are using media (particularly literature and performance) to share their stories, create safe spaces, organize and build intra-African collaboration and global allyship. What are queer African diasporic identities? What does queer African diasporic organizing and transcontinental art-making look like? How does traveling between one’s country of origin and the country immigrated to (within or outside of Africa) impact these identities? How does media (e.g., art, and, more specifically, literature and performance) impact, answer and challenge these questions?

PANELISTS: Yvonne Fly Onakeme Etaghene, Kagendo Murungi and Ola Osaze

 

Your History Is Your Legacy

LOCATION: Room 112A

DESCRIPTION: This workshop is a hands-on session for writers and publishers who are interested in arranging and organizing their writings, their drafts, and, of course, their personal, organization or business records. You will learn how to survey your collections, get advice on best practices for preservation, and how to be an advocate for endangered collections. A discussion on when to discard, when to keep, when to print, when to scan, and how to manage digital copies will hopefully inform the participants’ current practices, as well as develop new ones.

WORKSHOP LEADERS: Steven G. Fullwood and Shawn(ta) Smith

 

Spirit Speak: Writing with the Ancestors

LOCATION: Room 112D

DESCRIPTION: In this workshop, we’ll explore the role that the unconscious plays in human creativity. Drawing on West African and black American wisdom traditions while giving a nod to the sacred roles that LGBTQ, gender-variant, and same-gender loving people have embodied in cultures around the world, we will create a space of communal affirmation of giftedness and a safe container for expression of memory and subjective experience. Within this space, participants will learn techniques of automatic writing, dream recall, divination, sacred space-making and seership for intentionally connecting to the wells of inspiration whose waters rise up in our lives and writing. Through the cultivation of intuitive senses and the exploration of methods for tapping unconscious reserves of stories and images, participants will be equipped to move through creative blocks, take their work to deeper places, and gain a glimpse of the healing journey their craft is leading them on.

WORKSHOP LEADERS: Khi Armand and Langston Kahn

 

Birdwatching: Witnessing the Creative

LOCATION: Room 112B

DESCRIPTION: Bearing witness to the world can inspire creativity and just as often depress the creative flow. Sometimes witnessing the world is tremendously stress-inducing, and can paralyze creativity. Black queer artists must seek space where creative rejuvenation may be found; to genuinely connect with nature may offer creative insight into our daily, temporal worlds. When bearing witness in the world is unproductive, a turn to witnessing the natural world through birdwatching can often inspire faith, humor, insight and creative juices. In this workshop participants engage in a birdwatching walk as a form of creative meditation motivated by the “eye” of the “I.”

WORKSHOP LEADER: Laura Harris

 

5:30 – 6 p.m.

 

PERFORMANCE: M A P S : : a cartography in progress

LOCATION: Room 113ABC

DESCRIPTION: M A P S :: a cartography in progress engages the unbroken soul in perpetual (re)creation through sound, image and umph, through light and language, image and breath and fractured narrative reshaped and remade from Somali novelist Nuruddin Farah’s Maps (the first novel in Farah’s Blood in the Sun trilogy). “When will children stop wanting?” asks young Askar, the central character in Maps. “[W]hen will they accomplish something not as children but as beings?” With M A P S, Bashir creates a poetry of emergence which resists a resolution of Askar’s questions and pulls instead toward a next generation of questions in continuum.

PRESENTER: Samiya Bashir

 

6 – 7:30 p.m.

Dinner

(not provided)

7:30 – 9:30 p.m.

 

OPEN MIC: Pink Ice Presents: Welcome to Detroit! Open Mic

LOCATION: Room 113ABC

DESCRIPTION: Join host JY Obadele for an evening with some of Detroit’s top poets, featuring T Miller and D.S. Sence. Sound by EchoVerse’s own André Royster. Specially invited guests include Kalimah Locmama Johnson, Invincible, Torrena Dye, John Trimble, Keontaye, Mychael Noir and Lori Beth Coolidge. Later, meet up with your favorite poets at the afterglow. Welcome to Detroit!

Presented by Kimberly Jones/Pink Ice Promotions

 

afterglow (10 p.m. – midnight)

Buhl Bar
535 Griswold St.
Detroit, MI 48226

 

 

Saturday schedule

October 10, 2015

 

Altar Room

Location: Room 115 (open all day)

 

7 – 8 a.m.

 

Morning Literary Stretches

With Marvin K. White
LOCATION: 112A

 

8 – 9 a.m.

Breakfast

(not provided)

9 – 10:30 a.m.

 

LGBTQ Film: The New Black

Directed by Yoruba Richen
LOCATION: Room 111AB
Film program co-curated by Ernest Hardy and Tisa Bryant

Writing/Embodying Biography

LOCATION: Room 112D

DESCRIPTION: One of the most powerful ways for queer folk of African descent to witness each other’s lives is writing and performing our own stories. In writing our experiences, we document and revere them; in performing our experiences, we invite memory to reside within our marrow, and reflect and build community. This three-hour workshop remedies the historical absence of LGBTQ black folk from the American stage by inviting participants to explore and dramatize autobiographical and biographical experience. Through writing and performance, we will identify and employ approaches to scripting and staging original drama that reflect and amplify our unique experiences as queer folks of color.

WORKSHOP LEADER: Djola Branner

 

Tellin’ the Truth Lyin’

LOCATION: Room 112C

DESCRIPTION: In this three-part workshop, we will engage Zora Neale Hurston’s work to think through how we bear witness to our communities, how we tell the truth lyin’. We will then create new work based on the principles we have identified as central to telling the truth lyin’. And, finally, we will put our work in conversation with Zora and with each other. This workshop aims to honor and build on the legacy of Zora by creating a space to witness black (queer) life, and the richness of our creative and intellectual worlds.

WORKSHOP LEADER: Ana-Maurine Lara

Reconstructing Audre Lorde: An Exercise in Love and Memory

LOCATION: Room 114AB

DESCRIPTION: This session will look at the making of the new book, The Wind Is Spirit: The Life, Love and Legacy of Audre Lorde. A hybrid memoir-anthology, the book is written by Dr. Gloria I. Joseph, Audre Lorde’s partner in the last decade of her life. Linda and Clara Villarosa, the publishers of The Wind Is Spirit, will join Dr. Joseph to talk about how they put together the book Audre asked Gloria to write. Rather than a re-writing of history or a re-telling of familiar anecdotes, Gloria brings the past alive and reveals parts of Audre Lorde’s life that are new to readers, painting a fresh portrait of the flesh-and-blood woman she knew intimately for so long.

PANELISTS: Linda Villarosa, Dr. Gloria I. Joseph and Clara Villarosa

 

Queer Blood Relations: The Thickness of Witness

LOCATION: Room113ABC

DESCRIPTION: This is a workshop where we remember that we are related and witness each other on literal and literary terms. As an intergenerational team we will help participants map a lineage of texts that have allowed us to feel related, even when we faced isolation, and create a generative space for new texts that practice the life-saving work of witness and transformation. Using Alexis De Veaux’s Yabo and Alexis Pauline Gumbs’s Spill as grounding texts, this workshop will invite participants to write poems of witness for each other, testify to the queer blood connections that have made us possible, and prescribe each other life-changing literary texts. We will celebrate the family-reunion atmosphere of Fire & Ink and examine what models of being related we want to uplift and what models we want to transform.

WORKSHOP LEADERS: Alexis De Veaux, Alexis Pauline Gumbs and Julia Roxanne Wallace

 

10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.

 

LGBTQ Film: That’s My Face

Directed by Thomas Allen Harris
LOCATION: Room 111AB
Film program co-curated by Ernest Hardy and Tisa Bryant

 

Writing/Embodying Biography (continued)

LOCATION: Room 112D

DESCRIPTION: See above.

WORKSHOP LEADER: Djola Branner

 

Tellin’ the Truth Lyin’ (continued)

LOCATION: Room 112C

DESCRIPTION: See above.

WORKSHOP LEADER: Ana-Maurine Lara

Worlds Fall Away: A Roundtable on Black Queer Experimental Writing

LOCATION: Room 112B

DESCRIPTION: Samiya Bashir and Tisa Bryant convene a roundtable discussion about experimental work made by black queer writers. Come consider: When we talk about experimental writing, is our focus the work itself or the process? Are they even separable? Is black queer writing an inherently experimental expression of a radical imagination? Does the relationship between the written word and the word in performance relate to ideas of experimentation? Why experiment with form and structure? To make the world fall away, or to call a new one into being?  If we are to go the way our blood beats, why do so few seem to claim this particular drum? What’s the risk for those who do?

DISCUSSANTS: – Samiya Bashir, Tisa Bryant, Alexis De Veaux, Duriel E. Harris, John Keene and Rosamond S. King

 

Making Screenwriting Our Own

LOCATION: Room 112A

DESCRIPTION: Screenwriting can sometimes intimidate writers who are otherwise confident creating across a multitude of other genres and forms. The goal of this workshop is to create a safe, nurturing space to dip our toes into the waters of screenwriting and get comfortable. We will review the basics of screenwriting format, read some well-crafted scenes from screenplays and look at a few examples of how queer folks of color have crafted new (or very old) narrative structures to tell stories that might not easily fit into western structures. We will then explore a few ways to use characters and conflict to create compelling story structure and write and share some scenes with each other. Let’s all learn from each other and re-claim this uniquely visual medium to tell our own stories.

WORKSHOP LEADER: Langston Kahn

12 – 1:30 p.m.

 

Lunch

(not provided)

1:30 – 3 p.m.

LGBTQ Film(s): Tain’t Nobody’s Bizness: Queer Blues Divas of the 1920s and Dreams Are Colder than Death

Directed by Robert Philipson (Tain’t) and Arthur Jafa (Dreams)
LOCATION: Room 111AB
Film program co-curated by Ernest Hardy and Tisa Bryant

 

Open Mic

LOCATION: Room 113ABC

3 – 3:30 p.m.

 

Break

 

3:30 – 5 p.m.

 

Keynote Address

LOCATION: Room 310A

Welcome by Curtis Lipscomb, Executive Director of LGBT Detroit

PRESENTER: Randall Kenan

5 – 6:30 p.m.

 

Dig: Queer Archaelogies

LOCATION: Room 113ABC

DESCRIPTION: This is a conversation for those of us who dig; those of us interested in the dirt of black LGBTQ life, love and survival; those of us discovering and offering up an archive of experience that has been buried under oppression and misrecognition. When we hold black LGBTQ lives up to the yellow light of the photographer’s bulb, the red light of the digital recording device, the bright brown light of our faces, something changes. This conversation between people who search for and document the evidence of our existence as a resource for our continued brilliance may leave you dirty, but such is the layered quality of our love. Please join us for a public conversation between black LGBTQ archivists, researchers, oral historians and documentarians and an experiential archive activity.

PANELISTS: Jonathan Bailey, Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Lisa C. Moore, Zanele Muholi and Julia Roxanne Wallace

Multiplying Personalities: The Writer Witnessing Self and the Many Characters We Create

LOCATION: Room 114AB

DESCRIPTION: How do we filter the array of historical and contemporary literary and media influences and develop our own uniquely resonant writer’s voice? Further, how do we do this for the range of our characters and works—rendering them not only distinct from one another, but from us as writers and narrators? How much is literary voice and character development dependent on our experiences (personal history, geography and culture) and how much is it a matter of research, listening (borrowing) or outright creation? This panel of poets and novelists will share brief selections of their work and discuss how they were influenced by other writers/artists, but managed to hone their own creative voices and apply this skill in the development of their characters and work.

PANELISTS: G. Winston James, Ana-Maurine Lara, Charles Rice González and Marvin K. White

 

How to Witness Your Own Work: Developing a Reading or Performance Style

LOCATION: Room 112C

DESCRIPTION: You, the author, are the most important witness for your own work. Reading in public is an opportunity to literally give voice to your writing. Whether you write narrative poetry, experimental fiction or even scholarly prose, this interactive workshop will provide an introduction to the basic elements of reading literature out loud, and will expose you to a range of different performance styles. Writers should bring one page of their own work (10-20 lines of poetry or 200-400 words of prose) and should be ready to use their voice and body. Open to writers of all levels; all abilities welcome.

WORKSHOP LEADER: Rosamond S. King

 

6:30 – 8 p.m.

 

Dinner

(not provided)

8 p.m.

 

PERFORMANCE: Waiting for Giovanni

LOCATION: Room 113ABC

DESCRIPTION: Waiting for Giovanni, a two-act dream play, imagines a split second in the mind of author and activist Jimmy Baldwin. Under the shadow of an emotionally abusive past Jimmy reconsiders the 1957 American publication of his second novel about an ill-fated, love affair in Paris. With the U.S. in turmoil, especially after the murder of Emmett Till, how important can a book like this be? But Jimmy must write it despite threats to his own career and love affair.

PRESENTER: Jewelle Gomez

 

Sunday schedule

October 11, 2015

 

Altar Room

Location: Room 115 (open until 2 p.m.)

 

8:30 – 10 a.m.

 

Getting It Out: Producing and Publishing Our Stories

LOCATION: Room 110A

DESCRIPTION: Unlike never before black LGBT stories, particularly books, film and web series, can be shared with our communities around the world to bear witness and advance visibility and human rights. This interactive session uses lively discussion, audience interaction, projected visuals and video to reimagine the possibilities for increasing visibility of black LGBT stories on pages and screens. Participants will engage an intergenerational panel of writers, publishers and media producers to explore: 1) How our communities are evolving with the development of creative media outlets such as YouTube, Amazon’s Createspace and other self-publishing tools; 2) How we can better connect and share our stories while advocating for LGBT rights; 3) Which marketing and promotional techniques are most effective for increasing awareness about our work; 4) What stories still need to be told; and 4) What are the creative possibilities for our self-expression? Participants will leave the session with a deeper understanding of how they can create, market and distribute their work using new and traditional creative media

PANELISTS: Steven G. Fullwood, Lisa C. Moore, Akhaji Zakiya and Fiona Zedde

 

Poets as Witness

LOCATION: Room 113AB

DESCRIPTION: What relationship does the working writer have to the past? What part in shaping the present – and the future? Four emerging poets discuss the role of “witnessing” in their work and their lives.

PANELISTS: Reginald Harris, J.P. Howard, Bettina Judd, Rickey Laurentiis and Phillip B. Williams

Fire in the Belly: Witnessing, Writing and Thought Leadership on the Web

LOCATION: Room 114ABC

DESCRIPTION: Social media has had an increasing presence in social movements, organizing and citizen journalism. The art of social commentary and critique on the web using text, images and video raises important and challenging questions about the nature, methods and impact of traditional and contemporary forms of activism in the 21st century. In this panel session, black lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender thought leaders will share their experiences, lessons learned and challenges in witnessing and writing on the web. Through conversation with each other and the audience, the panelists will explore the craft of short form writing, ethical and ideological questions they confront in their work and the standards they use to evaluate the quality of their work.

PANELISTS: Dr. Herukhuti, Nathan James, D. Andrea Jenkins and Linda Villarosa

10 – 11 a.m.

 

Closing Remarks

LOCATION: Room 113ABC